Posts Tagged ‘Mobile Dogwash’

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The label you can  trust to meet your filthy needs, Chase Yer Tail once again come up trumps with a great four-tracker. It kicks off with Like Water from label dons Mobile Dogwash and DJ No Comment, who’s otherwise known as Aaron Higgins, from Dublin party fiends Transformer sounds.  It has a bowel-shaking bass, looped 90s techno chords and – of course, this being Dogwash – one of their patented scruffy acid lines. The eponymous quote from Bruce Lee introduces a manic third section from which you emerge, bloody and bruised.

OB1’s sound is cleaner, more separate – and funky as all hell. Indecent Exposure has a repeating siren throughout, but it’s in the acid lines where this is really happening. There are three or four of them blasting away. They build up to a breakdown where if you can imagine the acid lines like monstrous snakes and OB1 like a riot cop beating them back with a baton until ultimately he is overrun, then you’ve got the picture. By the end of the track they’ve taken over completely, rising in pitch and intensity until your veins explode, bloodying the pristine driven snow . I’m telling you, from the breakdown to the outro this is pure acid heaven. Round of applause for OB1.

So – what a great idea to have Indecent Exposure remixed by Twisted Tyrants (which the last time I looked was Mobile Dogwash and Dave Atomizer). As expected they bring the sleaze. Meanwhile, to take us home, is Jared Blyth, who usually appears as Nesbit. Reptiles comes with samples from Fear and Loathing and a suitably headbanging acid line, though as so often with Jared’s tracks it’s in the atmospherics where the real treasures lie. I especially like the looped horn, giving the track a 90s SUF feel. Bonzer!

Get it from: 909

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With its stellar line-up of Moss, Mills, Dogwash and Wax, Braingravy 4 always promised great things, and lo! Great things have come to pass.

Ride the Snake by Sterling Moss and Steve Mills leads off, and there is indeed something slithering about it – like a vast, mutated alligator feeding off luckless sewer workers beneath the city streets. Accordingly the track gets more and more corpulent, bottoms out to a cavernous, echo-strewn breakdown and then treats you to a delayed drop that, when it comes – when it eventually comes – tears off the back of your head. And that’s a good thing.

With a Parsnip is business as usual for Dogwash. i.e it rocks like a bastard. And how do they get those acid lines so damn filthy? After that, Burnout, from Jack Wax drops the old-school acid, 303 that couldn’t be more different from Dogwash if it tried. In terms of the EP it’s a brilliant change of pace, and hats off for that, while as far as the track itself goes, I’ve got one word: whoosh. It’s a builder, a grower. The kind of tune that like maggots festering beneath an aluminium cranial insert, will gradually burrow its way into your brain. And that, again, is a good thing.

Get it from: Juno Download

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Eyedropper from Acid Kazuals is an absolutely killer track, the whole thing teetering on the edge of crazy distortion, much like the narrator of the tale around which it’s built, who’s out for a walk when a tripping guy squirts an eyedropper full of acid – twenty or thirty hits’ worth, he reckons – into his mouth. “I realised I was in trouble,” he says, with commendable understatement, and the nightmare begins, soundtrack, this: acid like chainsaws, filthy riffs scuffing in the background, the whole thing seething with the ominous, something’s-about-to-go-horribly-wrong feel of The Gift. Miss it at your peril.

Next up is Make People Run by Mobile Dogwash vs Steve Getz , and it’s another scary sample, this one from Dexter (I think), underpinned by metallic 90s techno and of course a patented Dogwash acid line. It’s surpassed by the next track, Git Yer Freak On, mainly by virtue of those obese peak-time chords that slice through the second half of the tune. Lastly Total Shitstorm is Dogwash seen through the prism of vintage Stay Up Forever. Imagine any tune by Magnum Force torn apart by a pack of dogs and reassembled by silent children with no faces. Yeah, that evil. And then, just when you think you have the measure of it, a murderous acid line appears and the sky tears open. It’s a barnstorming end to yet another essential Chase Yer Tail release.

Get it from: 909 London

With releases on Injector, Corrosive, Acid Test… actually, just about every Acid label you care to name, as well as curating their own Chase Yer Tail label, Mobile Dogwash have been nothing if not prolific of late. Neither have they been spreading themselves thin. In fact, they remain on imperial form, releasing banger after banger, all of them with that distinctive Dogwash aesthetic.

Which is? Riff monsters. Sleazy riff monsters at that. Funky, sleazy riff monsters packed with boomy, sustain-heavy drums, squealing, melodic, phat ass acid lines, and all with the forward propulsion of a flaming car pushed off a cliff. Whether you’re playing out, you’re a bedroom warrior, or a techno-charged gym monkey, you drop a Dogwash track in a set and it is going off.

It’s all there on EP hightlight Fully Charged, which comes courtesy of the Dogwash & Dave Atomizer under their Twisted Tyrant moniker and broadly speaking sounds like how the soundtrack to Death Race 2000 should sound – if the job was given to a bunch of nutters from Sheffield.

Meanwhile, Head Noddin’ Shit by Acid Kazuals (Dogwash and Si McLean) has an old skool ‘wreck the discotheque’ sample, which lends the track a funky counterpoint to the sheet-metal percussion going on elsewhere – an approach explored on the last occasion Dogwash teamed up with Si McLean, funnily  enough, on Booty Assid. You like that tune, you’ll like this.

Next up, Laws of Nature by Orgy of Distortion (the Dogwash and Pablo Sonic Terrorist) has higher-pitched, more insistent acid and a declamatory female vocal sample that works a treat, while So Fuck All You boasts a low-slung, growly acid line, menacing drums and a frankly threatening vocal sample. (‘Threatening’ in the context of this blog meaning ace, of course). In short, a great EP from a bunch of producers that simply couldn’t be boring if they tried.

Get it from: 909 London

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Two of the four tracks appear on this superb Dogwash primer mix.

All four appear in a Rabbits mix to be found here.

In memory of the lovely Lady Sybil Crawley, I present a mix of a few recent favourites, a couple of old ones…

Tracklist

Chris Hawkins – Canarian Island (Trevor Benz remix)
Mobile Dogwash – Usual Pharmacology – Mobile Dogwash Remix
Temperature Drop – Mosquito’s Tweeter 2012 Remix
OB1 – Random Act
Osmo – Fuck Your Lies
Starsky & Hutch feat Fazmo – Bitches from Brighton
Chris Liberator & Sterling Moss – The Swarm
Tassid – It’s Ridiculous
Jye Feelgood – Acid Swamp
Tik Tok – 303 Brotherhood
Nesbit – The Game
Fantompowa Meets The Geezer – Dadawas
Convection Criminals – Fajitta Swing
Mobile Dogwash – Lucy Int Sky Wi Dogwash

Not only is Corrosive 909 04 a showcase for some of the best of what you might call the new guard of Acid Techno, but you can’t get a crusty credit card between the tunes, they’re that good. But, oh my God, someone’s put a gun to Cynthia’s puppy’s head and they’re forcing me to choose or the dog dies!

Well, Northern Monkey by Mobile Dogwash vs Pablo Sonic Terrorist plays host to one of Dogwash’s adamantium acid lines, and we always like to have a supply of those in the fridge in case of unexpected guests. So that’s a contender. Then you get Grim Reaper, courtesy of Tik Tok and The  ‘Atchet, which has a superb, fierce drop, fidgety acid, possibly the best break of the EP, and easily the best vocal sample of the EP. So that’ll be there or thereabouts.

Urk.

Meanwhile OB1 & MK303’s You Are a Machine has the old skooliest acid line of the bunch, alongside a dirty synth riff and an outro that’s as squealy and ace as The Rabbit’s Name Was, and will be getting a whole lot of play round here, so that’ll be in the running. While Zoid’s Spaced Out, on the other hand, is the EP’s most intense experience: industrial, hard and fast, downright scary, actually – so much so I was surprised to hear the Human Traffic sample halfway through, expecting something sci-fi or horror  – and then a thrilling machines-in-crisis end. For sheer, out-there insanity, when you need to frighten an old lady to death and claim the inheritance for example, it simply can’t be beat. Which also makes it a favourite.

And then you have Tassid’s Sketchie Fecker. And we love Tassid. We love Tassid because he in turn loves big BPMs and highwire acid lines, and never disappoints. Here he offers up the above in spades, with the addition of an insanely addictive synth melody which gives the track a really distinctive edge, underpinning some seriously agitated 303 work.

So, no. Can’t do it. Can’t choose between them. Sorry, Cynthia.

Get it from: 909 London



Mobile Dogwash – Don’t Fuck This Up
Whether it’s a rework or a reissue of the 2008 tune, I don’t know, but it’s got the usual Dogwash bad-assery in spades. In other words, loose, clattering drums, lots of noisy business and a mulchy acid line that burps like a sated cave troll. How they manage to get so much into a track without overloading it is most likely some kind of Jedi mind trick.

Acid Choci – Marijuana Kills
I love Choci’s stuff and played Xaxaxa to death but this hasn’t been doing it for me. Not sure why: maybe because the supremely insistent and bratty-sounding 303 doesn’t quite make up for an overall lack of wallop.

Osmo – Dark Rider
Pick of the EP is an epic, trancey builder from Poland’s Osmo that’s thrillingly dark, as sinister as a gleaming black van on the Washington beltway and builds up to a sample from – I think – Minority Report, before spinning off into kaleidoscopic waves of headfuckery. Listening to it sent me scuttling back to Osmo’s earlier release on SUF Projects and it turns out I completely overlooked that little gem ’n’ all.

Hectech – Screaming From Sao Paulo
Scream they do, borrowing Dogwash ideology for a storming intro, full of squalling, wrestling noise, and a wonderful outro, where the 303s are set to pant-shitting levels. It’s only the middle, oddly enough, arguably the bit where you really want the track to bring its A-game, that things fall a little flat.