Posts Tagged ‘Austin Corrosive’

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MK303’s Drugged Up is an outstanding track. Coming straight from SR’s no-nonsense division, the acid fires up right away, but it’s at around 1.40 that a riff begins blasting away behind the main acid lines, and it’s a total doozy, elevating the track from the realms of superior acid workout to something way better. A lot of tracks would happily rely on that one riff – not this one.

Meanwhile, Austin Corrosive breaks out the fatter, philthier acid for Sharks With Lasers. Austin’s recent tracks have had a real machinery-in-crisis sound to them, a feeling that they could, at any second, spin completely off the grid, and it’s an exciting, distinctive sound – the sound of a really in-form, confident producer. It’s a feeling that pervades the entire release, in fact. You get a sense of everybody involved stretching their wings.

Next, Tassid and D.A.V.E the Drummer on Sexual Advance. The track is basically a rework of the Adam Freeland track, We Want Your Soul, complete with the eponymous vocal and Bill Hicks’s ‘you are free to do as we tell you’ routine during the breakdown. Freeland’s track is a classic and it’s a brave man who evokes its memories, even in a new context, but Christ, this track thumps. Here the BPMs rise to Tassid levels, rather than drop to DtD levels, and Tassid tracks always bang. But this one? Whoosh.

Lastly, OB1 is, as ever, applying advanced acid techniques to his 303 on Fight War. First he has fun with drums, setting up a rolling, funky sound before laying down the first of the acid lines at around 1.40. The 303 are whipped to a frenzy, and with the looped ‘fight war’ vocal sample sounding suitably psychotic, the result is a truly breathless and relentless piece of acid techno, a stunning end to what is easily one of the best EPs of the year – if not the best.

Meanwhile, you can catch all of the Rejects plus various other ne’er-do-wells, including Rabbits fave Bad Boy Pete,  playing live at at Soitiz-organised bash in aid of the Headway charity. The party takes place at a secret location in Worcestershire on 7th December, and for tickets you’ll need to email soitizswifty@hotmail.co.uk. It promises to be epic.

Go to System Rejects’ website here.

Listen to the tunes here:

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Though the System Rejects crew are sticking to their original philosophy of keeping it vinyl, they’ve launched an offshoot  label for exclusive digi releases. There’s no crossover, they promise, and on the evidence of this first outing, no dip in quality either. Oh, and they came fully tagged.

Things kick off in fine style with Acid.647  by OB1. It has cantering percussion and a lovely echo-soaked kickdrum, with a brutal acid line acting as a framing device of for high-pitched squiggly sirens. A metallic riff not dissimilar to the breakdown in Unlucky Punk by Magnum Force completes the picture. Like a lot of the best London-style Acid out this year, it nods to the past while sounding bang up-to-date – with the emphasis on bang.

Next, Austin Corrosive’s Head Off finds him in a discursive mood, letting one of the acid lines meander down interesting melodic avenues before pulling it all back into shape where it tussles with another, both vying for supremacy of the track. Think of The Oracle by Cosmic Trigger given a sprayjob and you’re almost there.

Meanwhile, MK303’s Hero Challenge is as hard as nails. I dare you to listen to the intro without clenching your jaw. Jagged sounds drop in at will, intensifying what is a brutal, thrilling experience, while at the 2.47 mark there’s a break that is absolutely not to be missed, before a monumentally epic, transcendentally headfucking outro. There’s only one word for it, and that word is ‘Whoosh.’

Rounding out what is clearly a thoughtfully constructed release (two total bangers, two more idiosyncratic tracks) is Only Some Will Understand by Tassid. A breath of fresh air, it more or less dispenses with the usual structure, serving up a machines-in-crisis sound that not only rewards repeat listening but sounds brilliantly disruptive in the mix.

Get if from: System Rejects

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System Rejects is a new label, an “autonomous collective of techno artists and producers” united by a “passion for stomping techno music and  freethinking nonconformism,” which are all things we like here at Rabbits. The stomping techno, the freethinking, the nonconformism –bring it on, we say. What’s more, the label’s founders are none other than Austin Corrosive, Tassid, OB1 and MK 303, who you’ll be  familiar with – or you bloody well should be, at least – by virtue of their considerable talents at making kick-ass Acid Techno.

System Rejects 01, then, and slice my still-beating heart from my chest if it’s not an absolute cracker of a release. The Rejects all take a turn and first off is Austin Corrosive’s Nothing, where thuggish declamatory vocals speed up and slow down before dropping out completely and introducing epic acid of nuclear winter proportions. Meanwhile things get dirty  for Tassid’s Eat Your Own Face, a methylated-spirit-drinking tune, with echo-strewn riffs bouncing off another in their bid to escape an insistent high-pitched siren. The word I’m looking for is ‘cavernous’.

Next, and I’ve talked before about OB1‘s almost surgical precision with the old 303. Here on Factory Grade, he layers them across a patchwork of ravey noises then whips them onto a lithe, funky climax. I think it’s one of the best things he’s ever done.

On a similar high is Matt Knight aka MK303, whose Three Oh Three is very, very phat indeed, letting no-nonsense drums do the heavy lifting while a deceptively strolling bassline is attacked by high-pitched acid lines wielding razor-sharp tomahawks.

So. All good then. Frankly, all brilliant. The ever-so-slightly bad news – especially if you’re a digital Doris like me – is that System Rejects are sticking to their principles of keeping the releases strictly limited and vinyl-only, which means that… well, it means that they’re strictly limited and vinyl-only. You will want these tunes. You will want them a lot. Good luck with that.

Go to System Rejects’ website here.

Listen to the tunes here:


Cat no: Corrosive90902
Release date: 15/10/11
Get it from: 909 London

Let Me Know – A.P & Josh Inc.
BPM:
148
The funk is well and truly brought here, thanks to a grimy rap and general sense of busy-ness that keeps things bouncing along – so much so that you barely even notice the lack of 303. Fans of the duo’s last release on Cluster should like this one.

Recharge Remix – Tassid
BPM: 150
Tassid gets his hands on Austin Corrisive’s Recharge and the result is a deep and dark techno workout. He’s taken out the acid patterns but retained the sinister, tribal beauty of the original as well as the chanting, which he ghosts in every now and then. Also new is a ‘recharge it’ vocal sample, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t miss the 303.

Roll Em Phat – Mobile Dogwash
BPM: 146
Okay, so far this latest release from acid overlords Corrosive has been noticeably free of acid. A 303 free jamboree, you might say. But Mobile Dogwash put that right with a set of fat, filthy riffs that bark like angry guard dogs in the night. Powerful and dirty, filthy McNasty, it’s awesome stuff.

Raw ‘n’ Dirty – Tassid
BPM: 145
Tassid foregoes the acid for a techno sex workout. ‘Dirty!’ it goes, ‘Raw ‘n’ dirty, hot track!’ alongside a sleazy, hip-rolling kick that breaks down to the rap at 3.43 and resumes with even more power. Irresistibly funky.

Day Off – Zoid
BPM: 145
Itchy, bug-eyed acid flits in and out of paranoid percussion, then breaks down at around four minutes with samples of a news report (from what? I’d love to know) before firing back up into kaleidoscopic patterns. While the rest of the EP is pure head-nod, this one invites you to really listen, and you can tell Zoid’s stretching out here. In place of power is texture and the track has an urgent feel to it that extends beyond the demands of the dancefloor. We likey much.

Incidentally, Tassid, Zoid and Mobile Dogwash all feature in the Autumnal Acidity mix.


Some NEW acid in the mix, mainly from the last few months.

Tracklisting is:

Alex Kenji & Luigi Rocca – Acid Monks
F+S (Franz & Shape) – Acid One
Adam Derry – 130 Jam
Woo York & Vegim – Bass Machinnen (DAVE The Drummer dub mix)
D.A.V.E The Drummer & Marcello Perri – Purpose
Justin E – Resistance
Freethinker – Release The Scud
Freethinker – 401
Chris Liberator & Sterling Moss – Acid Corrosion
Steve Mills – London Acid Techno
A.P & Josh Inc – Pure fuzz
Nitronoise – Drink & Drive
Zoid – Day Off
Tik Tok & Turtle – Boxed Up
Tik Tok – Fucka Hooka (2011 mix)
Justin E – Jacob’s Ladder
Mobile Dogwash – Roll Em Phat
Acid Chochi – Running For Fun
OB1 – A Little Something
Subutex & DJ D8 – Fuck That
Austin Corrosive – Recharge
Tassid – Recharge Remix
KitShunt – With A K (1st Edit)


Cat no: Corrosive 002
Release date: 13/07/11

Get it from: 909 London

Acid Corrosion – Chris Liberator & Sterling Moss
BPM:
145
Clean, loud and efficient: a spry, fidgety acid line fades in slowly over the first minute-and-half before the kick drops away at 1.33, then slams back in at 1.46 with teeth-grinding ferocity . A whispered ‘acid corrosion’ sample tops things off by which time the acid line’s started to get all wide-eyed and raggedy and out of control. And though sadly it never quite goes to that promised next level it does have a long outro with the acid corrosion sample repeated, that you just know will sound great bubbling away in the mix.

Champion Sound – Austin Corrosive
BPM: 147
A fantastic homage to late nineties SUF and an interesting sonic workout in its own right, Champion Sound begins fast and stays there, dripping with acid lines so sleazy they’re downright pornographic. During an extended break at 3.42 things take a twisted, fucked-up turn, the noises weirder and more disorientating, the whole thing almost threatening to ping off in some random, unexpected direction. It’s thrilling, seat-of-the-pants stuff, and you sense that Mr Corrosive could get seriously ninja with with the head-wrecking noises if he so chooses. Hint: let’s hope he does.

Lethal Poison – Tassid **
BPM:
153
A jaw-droppingly good tune, this, its individual elements marshalled superbly, sounding as funky as it is hard. The funkiness comes via an M.I.A sample; the hardness partly from a brain-damaging kick, but mainly from an acid line that is to-die-for. No, really. It is to. Die. For. Fast and dirty and hard, you’ll grin when you hear it. You’ll get goosebumps and the hairs on your arms will rise like zombie hands from graves. Every track on this EP is great – I cannot get enough of Corrosive at the moment and this must be their strongest release yet  – but this track takes the honours. Just.



Cat no: Corrosive 909 001
Release date: 24/05/11

Get it from: 909 London 

Recharge – Austin Corrosive
BPM:
148
A big tune, this, with plenty to like, starting with hypnotic tribal drums and a vocal sample that gives it a finger of fudgy funkiness. Next a bad-tempered, distorted acid line drops by and kicks the place apart for a while. It’s got horns with it. Things get real nasty. Then it leaves and that funky vocal serenades us out. A good track and a total contender for best of the EP, although that honour ultimately goes elswhere. 

Loose Control – Fil Devious
BPM: 145
Buffeted kickdrum, a sample saying ‘lose control’ (not, ahem ‘loose control’), plenty of breaks and an acid line that builds, drops and builds again. A solid but unspectacular tune. Moving on, and the thinking behind Corrosive Digital is not only to run a digi-only label alongside the vinyl-orientated Corrosive, but also to showcase up-and-coming producers, so the next two tunes belong to a pair of names that are new to us.

Fix as Funk – Gav Feedback **
BPM:
145
…and the acid drops in straight away. First beat of the bar and that 303 is snarling: a big, funky acid line that dominates the first half of the track, leaving enticing little details to pop away in the background: old skool bleeps, nicely separated percussion, the ‘damn you all to hell’ sample from Planet of the Apes. Things are mixed up around the halfway mark, and that amazing 303 falls away a bit. Is it instrumentation? No, it’s a power loss. Is it supposed to end that suddenly? I don’t know, but it does. Even so, it gets the coveted double asterisk from me.

Dumbass – OB1
BPM:
155
The Dumbass of the title is George W Bush, and the track begins with his famous howler from 2000 when he declared, ‘We cannot let terrorists and rogue nations hold this nation hostile or hold our allies hostile.’ There are a couple of other Bushisms elsewhere in the track, and while the track’s okay, and the acid sufficiently screeching, it’s… I don’t know, having him in there just feels like an old joke that wasn’t very funny in the first place, and I can’t really get past it. Sorry.