Posts Tagged ‘A.P.’

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All your favourite Acid producers have tucked away their 303s for this Skuxx release. First A.P attacks Tassid’s awesome Raw ‘n’ Dirty on the remix. The original is a beast of a track, a coachload of screaming, terrified cheerleaders hurtling towards a cliff edge as the driver clutches at his chest and slumps dead to the wheel. Cleverly, A.P saves the cheerleaders. He even has the cheerleaders celebrating at the precipice as he reforms the tune into a bouncy party centrepiece. And it’s a cracker.

Meanwhile, Paranoia by Josh Inc. is a bit of a Marmite track, which is all I’ll say about that. Next, things get real filthy for MK303’s Section 6. Industrial-revolution era beats, metal-on-metal sparking: the man like Matt Knight lays down some extra-special powerage here, and the ‘section 6’ vocal gives it a focus, although it never quite develops as much as you wish it would. Lastly, Wretch is another hard-assed torture-chamber tune from the ever-dependable Tassid. It’s hard, it’s filthy, it sounds like demented tramps playing with operating-theatre equipment and it has a series of late-period breaks that keep the energy levels high.

Get it from: 909

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A.P. is taking no prisoners on Distort the Dancefloor. This is a tune that reminds you this is the guy who brought you High in Chicago, Ride It and Off Ya Box and he’s continuing to innovate. No acid – this is a pure techno track from A.P. – but the sound is tough. It has a repeating metallic motif that floats in and out of the kick and, like Cuttin’ It, his collaboration with Josh Inc. to be found elsewhere on the EP, has a subversive, disruptive feel which gives it a unique and distinctive sound. It’s a fecking winnah.

Pump It Up, the other A.P. solo track, is a more funk-driven hip-hop influenced tune, like he had some ideas left over from his rework of Tassid’s Raw N Dirty . Meanwhile, the other EP highlight is Piston 69, by A.P. and Josh Inc. which again uses distortion to superb effect and has a tremendous, long break prior to a hurricane-like finale.

Get it from: 909

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In recent weeks Soitiz has been relaunched with a fresh website design and even a new sister label. A press release about it is here, but in a nutshell what’s happened is that Swifty has teamed up with an established artist/producer, a ‘sleeping partner’ if you like, who’ll be helping out with mastering and A&R, while from now on the label will also have a sister label, Soitiz Silver, offering free downloads in order to help promote and establish new talent. Meanwhile, the long-awaited Soitiz 002, the Droppin’ The Acid EP, has appeared, so let’s take a look at that…

First up, Swifty and MK303’s brilliantly titled I Keep Saying No To Drugs But They Never Listen has a super-bouncy, rolling kick, that takes us up to a mini-break and drum roll at 1.39 when the main melody kicks in. And, hello, it’s the riff from Q Project’s Champion Sound given an Acid Techno makeover, underpinning some seriously unhygenic 303 action. Fantastic.

What’s Goin On is vintage A.P. He’s at his best when he’s slowly ratcheting up the tension and here he does exactly that. Opening with a low, growly, grid-friendly riff, like ominous noise on an empty rain-swept street, a growly 303 steps out of shadows, before around the halfway mark the whole caboodle pings off into some seriously squally, full-on footchase action.

Meanwhile, on Activate MK303 continues to tweak convention, dropping us straight into a tune that already feels fully formed. It’s anchored by a superb, signal-pulse, a siren call that gives the track its heart and gives MK303 the freedom to let the main acid line get loose, flitting in and out of the beats, rising and falling.

Lastly Serious Shit finds Starsky & Hutch raiding a vintage sounds for the build and when the acid arrives at at about 3.40 it’s gratifyingly fat. What’s more the track uses this sample from Back to the Future, which automatically distinguishes it in my eyes.

So there it is – yet another essential release from Soitiz. A rejuvenated Soitiz, no less, who are bringing more than just their share of enthusiasm and excitement to the scene, they’re brining raw talent and monster tunes too.

Impact UK is a new techno label from A.P. – and would you look at that? The last three reviews on here have been predominantly acid producers making techno cuts. Could there be something in the air?

Tassid’s Pest Infest (148 BPM) is typically fast and has a grotty bassline underpinning a filthy kick and marvellous, clattery percussion, like an orchestra of demonic children thrashing away at dustbin lids. A vocal gives way to itchy, agitated riffage and the end result is glorious filth of the first order. Highly recommended. Suck My Stomp Box (144 BPM), meanwhile, is pure metallic funk, thundering away like an explosion at an oil refinery. My absolute favourite, however, is Toilet Pervert (145 BPM). Here, liquid drums are almost perfectly weighted, then come ravey horns, which are soon stretched and mutated into cackling, leering shapes, speeded up and slowed down. Here is a place where sounds start as one thing then end up another, creeping in and out of a mix that’s gratifyingly busy and full of little tweaks and events, but not overloaded, while a vocal sample from Gil Scott Heron’s The Revolution Will Not Be Televised adds texture and also some unexpected gravitas. How it ended up with the title Toilet Pervert is one only A.P. and Josh Inc. can answer, but it’s an ace tune, and fully deserving of this, horror queen, Linnea Quigley with a chainsaw.

Get it from: 909

This latest from Serial Thriller, aka A.P, kicks off with a line of Coke, which has a cool, sneering acid line, although I don’t much care for the repetitive vocal. No, for me, this is all about the B-side, Do You Surrender? Exactly the kind of sonic attack we’ve come to know and love from A.P: layers coming slowly together, an exercise in controlled tension, then, at 5.45 going supernova, ripping up through the gears and ending up in his most intense and punishing outro since the phenomenal Off Ya Box. Brilliant, absolutely brilliant.

Get it from: 909


Cat no: Corrosive90902
Release date: 15/10/11
Get it from: 909 London

Let Me Know – A.P & Josh Inc.
BPM:
148
The funk is well and truly brought here, thanks to a grimy rap and general sense of busy-ness that keeps things bouncing along – so much so that you barely even notice the lack of 303. Fans of the duo’s last release on Cluster should like this one.

Recharge Remix – Tassid
BPM: 150
Tassid gets his hands on Austin Corrisive’s Recharge and the result is a deep and dark techno workout. He’s taken out the acid patterns but retained the sinister, tribal beauty of the original as well as the chanting, which he ghosts in every now and then. Also new is a ‘recharge it’ vocal sample, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t miss the 303.

Roll Em Phat – Mobile Dogwash
BPM: 146
Okay, so far this latest release from acid overlords Corrosive has been noticeably free of acid. A 303 free jamboree, you might say. But Mobile Dogwash put that right with a set of fat, filthy riffs that bark like angry guard dogs in the night. Powerful and dirty, filthy McNasty, it’s awesome stuff.

Raw ‘n’ Dirty – Tassid
BPM: 145
Tassid foregoes the acid for a techno sex workout. ‘Dirty!’ it goes, ‘Raw ‘n’ dirty, hot track!’ alongside a sleazy, hip-rolling kick that breaks down to the rap at 3.43 and resumes with even more power. Irresistibly funky.

Day Off – Zoid
BPM: 145
Itchy, bug-eyed acid flits in and out of paranoid percussion, then breaks down at around four minutes with samples of a news report (from what? I’d love to know) before firing back up into kaleidoscopic patterns. While the rest of the EP is pure head-nod, this one invites you to really listen, and you can tell Zoid’s stretching out here. In place of power is texture and the track has an urgent feel to it that extends beyond the demands of the dancefloor. We likey much.

Incidentally, Tassid, Zoid and Mobile Dogwash all feature in the Autumnal Acidity mix.


Some NEW acid in the mix, mainly from the last few months.

Tracklisting is:

Alex Kenji & Luigi Rocca – Acid Monks
F+S (Franz & Shape) – Acid One
Adam Derry – 130 Jam
Woo York & Vegim – Bass Machinnen (DAVE The Drummer dub mix)
D.A.V.E The Drummer & Marcello Perri – Purpose
Justin E – Resistance
Freethinker – Release The Scud
Freethinker – 401
Chris Liberator & Sterling Moss – Acid Corrosion
Steve Mills – London Acid Techno
A.P & Josh Inc – Pure fuzz
Nitronoise – Drink & Drive
Zoid – Day Off
Tik Tok & Turtle – Boxed Up
Tik Tok – Fucka Hooka (2011 mix)
Justin E – Jacob’s Ladder
Mobile Dogwash – Roll Em Phat
Acid Chochi – Running For Fun
OB1 – A Little Something
Subutex & DJ D8 – Fuck That
Austin Corrosive – Recharge
Tassid – Recharge Remix
KitShunt – With A K (1st Edit)


Cat no: SUF90908
Release date:
19/05/11

Contract
BPM: 145
The F.A.T Collective is well and truly bringing it this year: A.P’s Scythe Squadron tunes have been peerless (Can’t Get Enough probably the year’s most-reached-for track), Kick The Drum has announced its return to much online rejoicing and now the estimable Zoid releases this: two sides of 303 workout for SUF909. Having said all that, and at the risk of slightly contradicting myself, it’s not an especially strong release. The first side, Contract, is my least favourite. A stout kick lifts us off and at 1.03 a voice introduces an acid line that weaves its way in and out of the drum for the next five minutes but ­never really does anything interesting. Great for DJs, the breaks come with plenty of drum rolls, but on the other hand also add to the air of hoover that hangs over the whole thing. All right for some, perhaps. Not for me.

Riot
BPM140
Like Contract, Riot has a vaguely retro feel to it, but the sound is simultaneously trancier and more organic, and thus preferable (to these ears at least), plus there’s a great flutey break at around 3.30, featuring a motif that plays through the rest of the track. It lifts the tune, no doubt, but not quite enough to make it essential. And the funny thing is, neither of these two tracks is anywhere near as strong as the – count ’em – six tracks given away for zilch and nada on the recently rejuvenated Kick the Drum’s Soundcloud page. These are free for you to download and trust me, you should. Pick of the crop is Zoid’s own Panic Attack, which uses a Goodfellas sample and packs a filthy kick, while A.P.’s 9bar goes for full-on screechy 303, Distek’s Praktikal does funky tribal and The Badger’s It’s Not Rock ’n’ Roll, It’s Acid uses a weirded-up sample of John Lennon (I think) to superb effect. All told, there’s about eight quids’ worth of free tunes available – uncompressed, too – and they’re all outstanding. If Kick the Drum’s proper releases are anywhere near this good, then we’re in for a treat.


Here’s a mix I made of… well, it’s a bit daft to say it’s the ‘best’ Acid Techno of 2011 so far, since I can’t possibly presume to be familiar with it all but this is the best Acid Techno of 2011 that I’ve heard, at least.

The tracklisting is…

D.A.V.E The Drummer - Acid In The Box
D.A.V.E The Drummer & Chris Liberator - Twinkle Toes
Jamie C - Shitbag
Sterling Moss - Never Give In
A.P - Can't Get Enough
Syndrome – MFT (D.A.V.E. The Drummer Remix)
Austin Corrosive - The Drums
Ben Fraser - Tek Stream
Nitronoise - Missed F*ck
DDR And James Kinetic - The Cross Joint
D.A.V.E. The Drummer & Tassid - Keep It Going
Sterling Moss - Rock N Rolla
Chris Liberator & Darc Marc - Happy Birthday LSD
Nitronoise - Acid Crumble
A.P - Ride It
D.A.V.E The Drummer - Stop The System
Chris Liberator, Sterling Moss & Maxx - Deadly Swine
Hectech - Lock'n Loud